Ten Things Your Resume Must Communicate In Ten Seconds

Liz Ryan, Forbes
Print

Even when you send a Pain Letter directly to a hiring manager on your Target Employer List, your resume still doesn’t have an infinite amount of time to do its job.

Everybody is overwhelmed and over-stimulated these days. Your Pain Letter will open an aperture in your hiring manager’s mind — just enough for him or her to flip over your Pain Letter on its single staple and read your Human-Voiced Resume.

Your Pain Letter did its job. Your hiring manager’s mind is open just a crack. Now your Human-Voiced Resume needs to seal the deal and get your hiring  manager excited enough to contact you!

Here are the 10 things your Human-Voiced Resume must communicate in the 10 seconds (at most) your hiring manager will spend glancing at it:

1. Your Human-Voiced Resume must communicate to your hiring manager that you know what kind of work you intend to do. Your Summary will put that information across. You have to name your profession right away — you can’t be murky or mushy about it or the power of your message will be lost. Samantha, a job-seeker, begins her Summary this way: “I’m an IT Project Manager who specializes in large-scale software implementation.” She gets right to the point!

2. Your resume must communicate that you are smart and attentive. That means it can’t have any typos, spelling or usage errors in it.

3. Your resume must communicate that you understand your target hiring manager’s business enough to highlight your most relevant experience and to avoid using unrelated buzzwords, jargon and ‘insider terms’ from different functions and industries.

4. Your resume must communicate that you’ve slain numerous, gnarly dragons in your career already (no matter how experienced or inexperienced you may be). We all have powerful Dragon-Slaying Stories to share. Some of them describe events that only took a half-hour to elapse. So what? The power of a Dragon-Slaying Story is in your triumph on the day the story took place — not the amount of time it took you to slay (or tame) the dragon.

5. Your resume must communicate your understanding of your own career. The more you bring across the logical (if only in retrospect) progression you made from one job to another, the more strongly the self-driven aspect of your career will come through.

6. Your resume must communicate that you have the appropriate educational background for the job you want. If your training happened somewhere else besides a college campus that’s fine, but you have to make clear in your resume what you know about your field and how you acquired that knowledge.

7. Your resume must communicate the fact that you are capable and reliable without overtly saying “I am capable and reliable,” which is both grovelly and a waste of time. Use your resume to show the reader your best qualities — not to talk about them!

8. Your resume must communicate that you pay attention to details. Make sure that your resume and your Pain Letter are both printed in the same typeface (at the same size) and use the same paper and ink color. You can print both documents on plain white bond paper. Choose a heavier stock than you’d use to print something to be used once and then thrown away, like directions to a party. Don’t bother with dedicated “resume paper” you can buy at the office supply store. That is a dated approach that brands you a ‘professional job-seeker’ — the last thing you’d ever want to be!

9. Your resume must communicate the fact that you are your own person. Use a human, conversational tone through your Human-Voiced Resume (hence the name), starting with the Summary at the top of it. Avoid jargon like “Results-oriented professional” and “Motivated self-starter.” Tell your simple but awesome human story, instead!

10. Your resume must communicate to your hiring manager that a phone call or email conversation with you would be a very good use of their time. How will you convey that message? You’ll do it through your confident tone!

 

This article was written by Liz Ryan from Forbes and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Register now for further information on University of Europe Laureate Digital programs and become part of our global network.

  • MBA English (Bilgi)
  • MBA English (EUC)
  • MBA Air Transport Management (UEM)
  • Bachelors of Arts in English Language and Literature (EUC)
  • MA Early Childhood Education (EUC)
  • Master of Arts in Education Leadership (EUC)
  • Master of Arts in English Language and Literature (EUC)
  • Master of Arts in Special (Inclusive) Education (EUC)
  • Master of Arts in Technologies of Learning and Communication (EUC)
  • Master of Music Education (EUC)
  • MBA Sports Management English (UEM)
  • Print

    Filter articles

    Find
    FI - 7 Tips For Becoming Irreplaceable In An Age Of Machines.jpg

    7 Tips For Becoming Irreplaceable In An...

    Global Network
    FI-intrapreneurship.jpg

    Intrapreneurship: How Millennials Can Innovate And Influence...

    Your Skills
    FI - Smart Moves To Spark Your Career.jpg

    Smart Moves To Spark Your Career

    Professional Advancement

    Filter articles

    Find

    Spotlight

    Networking

    Looking for some mentor and assistance to chose your learning path? Find it in our network!

    Connect
    Our Exclusive Partners

    Know more about our network of exclusive partners made of some of most the most important european universities

    Learn More
    Our Programs

    Explore our offering of degrees across all key areas of study, from business to health, available in major languages

    Learn More
    Skills Assessment

    Take our skill assessment tests to learn about yourself, you strengths and weaknesses (this section is only available in english)

    Take a test